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Collection: American Art
Date: 1975
Artist/Maker: Shusaku Arakawa
Classification: Prints

The lithograph and silkscreen print and/or in profile is a highly conceptual and technically masterful art image by Shusaku Arakawa. He used language and symbols simultaneously as image and text so that a viewer is also a reader. The construction of meaning is both achieved and undone in the process of looking, leaving the viewer to ponder the mutability of both language and art.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1982
Artist/Maker: Richard Artschwager
Classification: Prints

One of Richard Artschwager’s main preoccupations has been perception and the devices used to convey the illusion of space. He was an accomplished furniture designer, and worked with wood and Formica in addition to painting on Celotex fiberboard, a rough industrial material.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1982
Artist/Maker: Richard Artschwager
Classification: Prints

A painter and sculptor who at one time supported himself by designing furniture, Richard Artschwager was described in The New York Times in this way: “A master of the reconstructed readymade, an assiduous manipulator of appropriated images, forms and uningratiating, non-art materials (often within the same hybridized painting-sculpture), Mr. Artschwager established himself as a free agent, a jack-of-all-trades.” [1]

Collection: American Art
Date: 1833
Artist/Maker: John James Audubon
Classification: Prints

The rarest of the North American songbirds, Bachman’s warbler was named by John James Audubon for his friend and collaborator, the Lutheran minister Reverend John Bachman of Charleston, South Carolina. Unusual even in Audubon’s time, this delicate bird, native to the southeastern United States, is now believed to be extinct. Through various artistic tropes, the artist emphasizes the elusive quality of the species, which he never observed in its natural habitat.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1830
Artist/Maker: John James Audubon
Classification: Prints

Blue Jay demonstrates John James Audubon’s mastery at creating lively compositions which he developed from both direct observation and the specimens he collected. Engraved by Robert Havell after Audubon’s original watercolor, it captures the villainous character of its subject with a restrained beauty. Plate no. 102 from the magnus opus The Birds of America, the image depicts two female and one male blue jay feasting on the eggs of an unidentified bird.

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