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Collection: American Art
Date: 1982
Artist/Maker: Rudolf Baranik
Classification: Prints

As a self-styled “social formalist,” Rudolf Baranik was best known for his protests against the Vietnam War. In 1981, however, a personal tragedy changed his outlook on life: the death by suicide of his son. Words F.A.F.A. was one of many attempts to deal with his grief.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1923-1924
Artist/Maker: George Wesley Bellows
Classification: Prints

In 1917, shortly after he first began experimenting with the medium of lithography, George Bellows described his technique in a letter to a friend:

Collection: American Art
Date: 1920
Artist/Maker: George Wesley Bellows
Classification: Prints

In 1917, shortly after he first began experimenting with the medium of lithography, George Bellows described his technique in a letter to a friend:

Collection: American Art
Date: 1936
Artist/Maker: Thomas Hart Benton
Classification: Prints

For his murals celebrating American culture and mores, Thomas Hart Benton traveled extensively across the country, sketching and recording vignettes for a future autobiography. Along the Mississippi River he mused: “The thought of floating effortlessly away on running water has an irresistible charm whether or not there is any real purpose or end set to it.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1936
Artist/Maker: Thomas Hart Benton
Classification: Prints

Thomas Hart Benton’s choice of lithography for his forays into printmaking is a logical extension of his egalitarian attitude. The medium originated in the mid-nineteenth century and was used early on for newspaper illustrations. Its relative inexpensiveness was one of the reasons the process was revived in the 1920s and 1930s. Frankie and Johnnie is one of four lithographs produced in conjunction with Benton’s Missouri State Capitol Building murals from the mid-1930s.

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