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Collection: Historic House
Date: 1921
Artist/Maker: Boris Bernhard Gordon
Classification: Paintings

This portrait by Boris Gordon depicts Katharine Smith Reynolds (1880–1924) sitting in a tapestry chair. [1] Her body is turned away from the picture plane, but she regards the viewer with a pleasant and engaged expression. She wears a bright blue, sleeveless dress adorned with a brooch at the bust. Her dark wavy hair is bobbed, with soft bangs across her forehead. She sits with her legs crossed, and her clasped hands rest on her knee.

Collection: Historic House
Date: 1920
Artist/Maker: Boris Bernhard Gordon
Classification: Paintings

This portrait by Boris Gordon depicts Katharine Smith Reynolds (1880–1924), widow of the tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, and her daughter Mary (1908–1953). [1] Katharine is seated in a purple chair holding a large peacock feather fan. She is wearing a bright blue sleeveless dress with a blue-and-gold patterned underskirt. She also wears a long strand of pearls. Her dark wavy hair is bobbed, and she smiles with her lips slightly parted.

Collection: American Art
Date: 2000-2001
Artist/Maker: Julie Moos
Classification: Photographs

A Canadian-born artist who was living in Birmingham, Alabama, in 2000, Julie Moos was invited by a member of the New Pilgrim Baptist Church to photograph women in the predominantly African American congregation who were celebrated for their elaborate hats. Moos is known for photographing people in pairs; other series focus on high school “friends and enemies” or employers with their domestic servants.

Collection: American Art
Date: 1755
Artist/Maker: Jeremiah Thëus
Classification: Paintings

The daughter of a prominent South Carolina family, Elizabeth Allston married Thomas Lynch, another well-connected South Carolinian, in 1745. At age 17, she became the mistress of Hopsewee Plantation, where the Lynch family cultivated rice and indigo. [1] As was typical of southern plantations, Hopsewee was located on a river. The river ensured easy transport of the plantation’s crops to market, where indigo was much in demand as a dye for the woolen industry.

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